Systems and Symbols

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Review of Thor

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For some time now I’ve been planning on writing a review of the movie Thor. After putting it off for a long time I decided that now would be a good time to write it considering the recent release of “Thor II: The Dark World.”  Many people within the White Nationalist movement have expressed their displeasure over Thor for its use of non-Whites in the role of Norse gods. They do have a point, but I believe that the movie has some interesting aspects to consider, especially for those who listen to the Follow the White Rabbit radio show and who have an interest in the subject of the White gods (1).

The movie pretty much starts out with the Norse god Odin explaining the nature of the universe to his two sons, Thor and Loki.  He talks about the last great war between the Asgardians (Norse god type people) and the Frost Giants. The frost giants were defeated by Odin and his army and their source of power was removed from their planet Jötunheim. Interestingly enough, the castle of the frost giant king was a structure that featured two towers. This got me wondering if Jötunheim was actually “Judenheim?”

So we next see the great hall of Odin and thousands of Asgardians watching the crowning of the new king of Asgard, Thor. While Odin swears in Thor to be King, three frost giants are breaking into the Asgardian weapons vault.  Somehow Odin senses this and taps his spear on the floor once which causes a giant robot called a “Destroyer” to come out and kill the three frost giants as they try to remove something called a “casket” from the vault. This “casket” is a blue brick type device which, if you look closely, has a small swastika on it. The casket is an energy device and it appears that without this device that the frost giants pose less of a threat to the rest of universe?  Next we see Odin, Thor, and Loki in the weapons vault.  Thor is calling for invasion of Jötunheim but Odin rejects the idea as foolish and unnecessary. Odin reminds Thor that he’s not the king yet, and later we see Thor reacting as a child by tipping over a banquet table.  What was interesting about this was that Thor wasn’t ready to be king, but it wasn’t Odin who stopped the crowning ceremony but “fate” or perhaps a force beyond the understanding of even the Asgardians (who appear to be the most powerful beings in the universe).  Odin could have still crowned Thor king later that day but may have read the “signs” of the frost giant break-in as a reason to wait. It appears that Odin still recognizes a power greater than himself?

While watching the world of Asgard it’s interesting to consider their technology. You don’t see cars, or spaceships, or computers, or even light bulbs. But at the same time, they have technology that allows them to live for millions of years and travel across the universe is seconds. They use fire as their main heating source.  There was no TV or radio, and they appeared to be minimalists, in that their living spaces didn’t have much except the bare necessities.  Their weapons are traditional weapons (swords, hammers, spears) and you see no firearms or guns. In an earlier scene when Odin is fighting the frost giants, you see that his spear can fire out a laser of sorts, but it’s still a spear. The Asgardians still mostly rely on hand-to-hand fighting prowess. They also ride horses.

Next we see Thor pouting over the fact that he didn’t get crowned king.  Loki uses neuro linguistic programming (NLP) to suggest (while arguing against) visiting Jötunheim and Thor falls for it.  So Thor, Loki and Thor’s friends get on horses and ride to the bifrost site. The bifrost is a counter-rotating device that can send people across the universe in seconds.  The bifrost is guarded by the Norse god Hiemdall. Heimdall in the movie is played by a black man, which takes away from the aesthetic quality of movie (a better choice would have been Kevin McKidd). The movie would have been much more powerful if they used only White actors for the parts of Norse gods, but this is the nature of our current entertainment industry so we’ll just have to deal with it (for now).

Thor and his crew get to Jötunheim and almost leave without fighting but do so after one of the frost giants insults Thor (Thor can’t take the insult and instead endangers his friends by fighting).  Right before Thor and his crew are about to get beat a rainbow light comes from the sky and here appear Odin on his eight legged horse.  This was one of the best scenes of the movie as Odin’s horse whinnies with Odin dressed in full battle gear while holding his spear in the air.  If the White gods are readying for a real invasion of earth, I do hope very much that they’ll appear like this rather than in space ships. It really delights me to picture Odin on his horse appearing over London traveling out of the bifrost. While a fleet of spaceships would be frightening to the current vipers running the earth, a giant man on an eight legged horse just seems symbolically even more distressing?  When Odin appears Thor yells out to Odin “father we’ll finish them together,” in which Odin replies “silence” as a father would to an insolent child.

After an exchange with the frost giant king, Odin zaps the frost giant king and the Asgardians fly back to Asgard. Odin and Thor argue over Thor’s actions and Thor calls Odin a foolish old man.  Odin agrees that he was foolish to think that Thor was ready for kingship and banishes Thor from Asgard. Odin removes Thor’s power which appears to be tied to his suit and hammer?  One amusing part of the argument between Thor and Odin is when Loki tries to intervene on the side of Thor and Odin just growls at him (in a way that said “I don’t want to hear your bullshit”).

Thor lands on earth and is hit by an RV being driven by a scientist name Jane. Her and her two colleagues get out of RV and find Thor on the ground.  Jane’s colleague Darcy tases Thor, but before getting tased Thor calls out to his father and tells Heimdall to open the bifrost.  Thor calls for his hammer and Darcy says “ya, we know you’re hammered.” This was quite funny.  They take Thor to the hospital where Thor starts fighting the hospital staff in the ER. Here we see that while Thor is stronger than most humans, that he’s not “superhuman” without his “power” which was removed by Odin.  He’s just a really strong dude.  The hospital staff manages to knock him out with a sedative.

When Thor was banished from Asgard Odin also threw his hammer down to earth with him.  Some locals find the hammer but no one can pick it up. A government agency called SHEILD (sort of a “Majestic 12” type organization [2]) shows up which cordons off the area and starts doing testing on the object.  After leaving the hospital Thor runs back into Jane and they go to the local diner to have breakfast. In another comical scene Thor announces that he “likes this drink” (referring to what I think is coffee) and smashes the cup on the ground of the diner while demanding another.  Jane rebukes him and makes him promise not to smash things anymore. This scene got me thinking about what the personalities of the White gods would be like if they came to earth?  I assume it could be somewhat intimating being around beings of this sort? If you’ve ever been around an Army General, or a Senator, or CEO of a fortune 500 company you can probably attest that a certain nervousness comes over you in their presence. This nervousness is probably increased 100 fold being in the presence of the powerful White gods?  I imagine when these beings meet with the highest leaders of our earth that the earth leaders feel and little wobbly in the knees? I would assume that these White gods would be extremely capable, confident, and serious and that they’re not the type of people you want to get on their bad side with?

Next we find Loki in the weapons vault investigating the “casket” taken from the frost giants. When Thor and the crew went to Jötunheim one of frost giants grabbed Loki’s arm and Loki started turning blue (like a frost giant). As Loki grabbed the casket in the weapons vault, we see him turning blue again and Odin is then heard in the background yelling “stop.”  Odin then tells Loki of the true story of his birth. Loki finds out that he’s actually frost giant and that Odin took him from Jötunheim in the hope that Loki would one day bring peace between Asgard and Jötunheim. As Loki falls into an existential identity crises Odin starts to fall into the “Odin Sleep.” One strange aspect of Loki is that while he is a frost giant, that he takes the appearance of an Asgardian. He only turns blue when he touches another front giant or touches the casket. This was never explained in the movie?

This so called “Odin sleep” appears to occur out of blue and puts Odin in a coma like state where he’s asleep for long periods of time. However, we find out later than Odin can actually see the happenings of the universe while in the Odin sleep. Odin lives for millions of years so the Odin sleep appears to be a requirement for this long life. I would speculate that if real intergalactic beings of this sort existed, that long period of space travel would be optimal for such regeneration sleep. Perhaps they get into space craft and “wake up” ten thousand years later just as humans would wake from a night of sleep.

After Odin falls into the Odin sleep and Thor is banished from earth, Loki is found sitting on throne of Asgard.  There was a great shot of Loki’s shadow with his horned helmet looking rather “devil like” while on the throne.  Thor’s friends ask Loki to bring Thor back from earth but Loki refuses. If you look to the left of Loki while he tells the friends that “Odin fell into the Odin sleep,” you can see a stylized “666” in the artwork of throne.  Here too we see the producers of “Thor” sending a message that Loki is a Satan type figure.

One good additional character was Dr. Selvig.  Selvig was from Scandinavia and was familiar with the stories of Thor, bifrost, and mjolnir (Thor’s hammer). He tries to point out how this stranger “Thor” must be a crazy person.  Of course, Jane couldn’t resist the alpha male characteristics of Thor and decides to drive the crazy man to the site where his hammer fell to earth. Thor then takes on the US government and beats up all the guards including a large black fellow that Thor takes down with an impressive drop kick.  Here again we see that Thor is stronger than most humans but not superhuman. After beating up all the government security, Thor goes to grab his hammer but can’t. He’s unable to lift the hammer of Thor and is arrested by the US government.  Earlier when Thor is banished from Asgard, Odin takes Thor’s hammer and says “whoever be worthy to carry this hammer will have the power of Thor” before throwing to earth with Thor.  It appears Thor is not yet worthy to hold his hammer.

The government now has Thor and is interrogating him.  Thor refuses to talk and the government agent leaves the room.  As he leaves Loki appears and tells Thor that Odin is dead from the strain of Thor’s actions.  Further he tells Thor that he must remain on earth if war if to be avoided with the frost giants of Jötunheim. This of course is all a lie and Loki also jabs at Thor’s vanity by saying “it was so cruel of Father to put the hammer in your reach knowing you could never lift it.” They give their goodbyes and the government agent comes back into the room. We then see Loki trying to life the hammer but is unable to do so himself. Loki was invisible to the government workers around him so he appeared to have some kind of invisibility technology?

The agent interrogating Thor is then informed that Thor has a visitor.  Dr. Selvig comes to the hammer site and tells the government that Thor’s an old colleague of his named “Donald Blake.”  The government lets Thor go and he and Dr. Selvig go to the local bar to get a drink.  I doubt that the government would be so kind to allow a man to go that just fought through 15 government agents, but the story must go on. Thor and Dr. Selvig sit down for a beer and later we see Thor carrying Dr. Selvig back to Jane’s RV where he explains to Jane that “we drank, we fought, he made his ancestors proud.”  It appears Thor could handle his drinking better than Dr. Selvig. Thor and Jane then talk by the fire. Thor explains to Jane the working of the universe and that where he’s from “magic and science are one in the same.”  Thor could have taken advantage of Jane but covers her up like a gentleman instead.

Loki is then seen in Jötunheim making a deal with the frost giants.  He explains to them that it was he who sent the instructions on how to break into the Asgardian weapons fault.  Loki says that it was “all just good fun” in his trickster way “to mess up his brother’s big day.” Loki then tells the frost giants that he will bring a handful of them into Asgard to kill Odin as he sleeps and then will allow them to take their casket back.  The frost giant king agrees.

Thor’s friends decide they have to find Thor. The four friends were Fandral, Hogun, Volstagg and the Lady Sif. Only Sif is taken from Norse mythology, as the other 3 are Marvel comic characters. The character Hogun was played by an Asian character and in the back story it is told than he’s from another world that was destroyed in the past. The character of Volstagg is played by the excellent actor who played Titus Pullo in the HBO series Rome. So the four friends go to earth and find Thor. Dr. Selvig drops his coffee when he sees the friends show up and realizes that Thor isn’t a crazy person. Loki then finds out that the four friends went to find Thor and orders the Destroyer to “make sure my brother doesn’t return.”

The destroyer comes to earth and the government agents see it first. They first think that it’s US government technology and the head agent gets on the megaphone and says “attention you’re using unregistered weapons technology.”  The giant robot then fires fire from its head and destroys the government vehicles. The government vehicles are Acura SUVs with the masonic compass as the emblem. The destroyer then walks to the town and starts destroying.  The four friends try to fight it but are no match for the giant robot. Thor then offers his own life pleading to Loki that it’s better to kill him than to kill the people in the town.  The robot smacks Thor and appears to kill him. While this happens Odin can see what’s occurring and a tear rolls down his face.  After Thor gave his life (in a Jesus like manner) we see Thor’s hammer shake loose and fly into the air.  It flies into Thor’s hand and Thor rises from the dead hammer in in the air. When we see Thor come out of the light he’s dressed in full battle uniform and Jane say “Oh-my-God!”  Thor is a god (with a small g) at that point everyone now knows it.  Thor makes short work of the destroyer. In a comical part the head government agent walks up to Thor and says “Donald, you haven’t been totally honest with me.”  Thor then grabs Jane and flies to the bifrost pick up point.

We then see the frost giants enter Odin’s bedroom. Odin’s wife “Frigg” takes out two of the frost giants with a sword before getting smacked to the side. The frost giant king is about to kill Odin when Loki then kills him. Loki set up the whole thing for him to be the hero but then Thor shows up and ruins it. Loki blasts Thor with Odin’s spear and moves to the bifrost site to destroy Jötunheim. Loki sets up the bifrost to destroy Jötunheim and freezes it so Thor can’t stop it.  Thor tries to tell Loki that he “can’t kill an entire race.” This made me think that if there is some kind of federation of space people that such a law may be in place?  Perhaps the current globalist elites are facing judgment from Odin and Thor for trying to wipe White people (See “Program for White genocide” page above) from the face of earth?  Is Loki the globalist elite’s master on earth (more on this below)?  Anyway Thor smashes the bifrost to stop Jötunheim from being destroyed but by doing so is now unable to see his love interest on earth (Jane). Thor not only sacrificed his life earlier but now ended his chance to be with the women he likes. Loki falls from Asgard in Lucifer like fashion.  The movie pretty much ends with Thor being a wiser, more humble leader of Asgard.

Overall despite its multi-racial flaws, I thought Thor was a solid movie.  It’s the first movie that features the White gods of mythology, so it’s good for White people to be exposed to this.  It’s very much a movie of fathers and sons.  It’s a movie about growing up and serving others before your own vanity.  Thor took up a Christ like role in the movie which fits well with him being a “son of god” that I described regarding the White Path religion (3).  Loki also takes up a familiar role as Satan or Lucifer. Loki is a jealous being who had a very good life but it wasn’t good enough for him. Like Lucifer, Loki wanted to be the king. He used deception and duplicity.  He was even willing to kill his brother and put his father at risk fo death just to get his own way. But again like Christ, Thor tries to forgive Loki even after all his sins against Asgard and their family.  The movie also warns us about the dangers of diversity. With good intensions Odin brought Loki into Asgard but it proved to be a very bad decision. I hope that his movie will inspire future movie makers to create a more serious movie about the White gods. There is so much potential with this subject that I can’t figure out why movie making people don’t do so?  Perhaps the real thing is coming to earth making such movies unnecessary (4)?

(1) https://systemssymbols.wordpress.com/2012/09/23/the-white-gods/ and https://systemssymbols.wordpress.com/2012/09/23/the-white-gods-part-ii/

[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Majestic_12

(3) https://systemssymbols.wordpress.com/2013/09/08/the-gods-on-the-white-path/

(4) https://systemssymbols.wordpress.com/2013/08/31/the-return-of-the-high-one/

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One thought on “Review of Thor

  1. Jack Dawes on said:

    Overall a very good review. Although the Satan reference with Loki was obvious, you overlooked something potentially important. Although Thor is romanticized in the film, the way he was expelled from Asgard actually looked more in line with Milton’s account of Lucifer’s Fall from Heaven; only in this case, 1/3 of Asgards warriors (or Angels) weren’t cast down with him. And of course, Thor redeems himself in the end. One of the things Horus has said is that the different pink rabbit factions have kind of a friendly rivalry with each other; if you can call it that. Maybe Thor was the Nergal fan club booing Enki? Then again, the Destroyer could also be an intended reference to sci-fi Lucifer? I don’t know…

    Here’s some more reading on movie symbolism you may enjoy:

    https://hollywoodsubliminals.wordpress.com/egyptian-mythology/set/

    And here’s something about the black cube symbol we see everywhere:

    https://hollywoodsubliminals.wordpress.com/black-cube/

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